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20121001
20121031
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 171 (some duplicates have been removed)
. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides per year in the city of los angeles, not the county, the city. now, we have between 203 hundred homicides per year. people talk about the gang problem having been addressed. i want to share with you, what i experienced, what i have learned, i am not a typical academic. i will not quote statistics to you or talk about theories. i will talk with you about practicality. pragmatic approaches, and i will talk about reality. san francisco, like los angeles learned, will never saw or deal with its gang problems effectively unless there is true collaboration. i will talk to you about what this looks like and feels like. i will speak to you about the lessons that we have learned as law enfor
with law enforcement, with the lapd and the los angeles county sheriff's. i am here to tell you that crime has been driven down in los angeles because of their efforts, but not only because of their efforts. so what does the collaboration look like. i want you to keep some ideas in mind. there is no first among equals. what we learned in los angeles was that oppression alone was not the answer. it did not work. there were record highs in gang violence in 2005. i want to tell you what has happened between 2005 and 2012. number one, the grass roots -- the disorganize, fragmented, passionate grass roots must be part of this. the community members who go to county supervisors meetings, the members who pass out fliers, the youths who have been in the juvenile justice system that are now part of the coalition -- those individuals must have a seat at the table. no. 2. community-based organizations. that operate on a shoestring and often without any kind of coverage anywhere. they must be legitimized and made part of the conversation. i have witnessed this with homeboy industries. how many people
in sales to minors, which was out of los angeles county, and asked what they do. they do have that in their ordinance this they can charge these monetary penalties. because of the success rate i was interested in what they did and they strictly do suspension of permits. and our ordinance here in san francisco, the way we read it, it doesn't allow for any kind of monetary penalty. clearly a violation of california penal code this section 308 only allows for us to do a suspension on the permit, which was what we did in this case. >> how did you arrive at the 30 day determination? >> i took over this program. actually this was the first round of cases i received when i took over this program in april. i continued the policy that had been in place, my understanding, for years of a 30-day suspension. so i just continued the existing and standing policy the department of public health has. >> 30 days for first offense, even though you could suspend up to 90 days? >> correct. the hearing officer, of course, can reduce or increase up to 90 days or reduce to one day based on the
with the unexpected consequences from their early infrastructure design. los angeles county is a land of sprawling development. with development comes hundreds of square miles of concrete, leaving no way for water to naturally soak into the ground. in areas of such widespread urbanization, flooding can be devastating. man: back in early 1930s, there was a flooding that took a lot of lives and property. as a result, the city of los angeles, in order to protect future flooding in the city, they decided to take the los angeles river and make it a flood control channel. they concreted the walls of the river in order for water to get to ocean much faster. narrator: cities throughout southern california converted natural rivers to these concrete channels, part of their storm drain systems. this allowed expanding development without the need for large flood plains. kharaghani: the los angeles river is approximately 51 miles. concrete reduces the size of the river that you need to carry the water because it speeds up the flow of water. if you'd like to remove all the concrete and to have natural system to
by the los angeles riots, when that occurred, put me on the path toward public policy and understanding what it meant to have opportunities and not have opportunities in our various communities. >> why did you choose to live in san francisco? supervisor chu: i came to the area to pursue a master's degree in public policy at the uc- berkeley school. ever since then, i fell in love with what a wonderful area the bay area is. >> what motivated your interest in politics? supervisor chu: to be frank, i never saw myself in an elected position at all. i had grown up in southern california, and during the first day of the los angeles riots, my parents had their cars stolen at gunpoint. they were left out and had to pay someone $100 to get back to chinatown. it really influenced me. we had a restaurant at the time, and at the time, we were always worried, watching the news, to see whether or not the restaurant would be looted, whether or not it would go up in fire. that was something that was a big concern and worry for my family at the time. i remember thinking even at that age how important it was
. it is 1989 and you are now working in los angeles. after being a patrol officer for just a few months, you are placed on gang detail. you have arrested a youth. instead of taking him to jail, you taken to his mother. the mother says, can you make him more afraid of you that of the gang members? the academy does not prepare you for that. i take that experience and i realized in the gang environment, most of these youths are coming from single- family households. in the area where the gang violence is most prevalent, great citizens of the community, 99% of those citizens are afraid. as a prosecutor, i take this experience and figure out how i want to enforce gang violence, especially in san francisco. i break it down into three categories. you have the individual who is not fully immersed in the gang lifestyle. he is just an associate comment just hanging out. -- associates, just hanging out. for that individual, we try to work with community-based programs. i've met with dcyf, the african- american steering committee, people haven't been in this violence and i say to them, what can -- peopl
. in population centers like los angeles, the scope of the task is staggering. the hyperion wastewater treatment plant serves four million people. it processes 350 million gallons of sewage and removes 500 tons of solids daily. after treatment at hyperion, what was once raw sewage is clean enough to release into santa monica bay. other cities and towns release treated wastewater, or effluent, into local rivers, lakes, and streams. as it flows downstream, additional cities may capture it for drinking water, consume it, and treat the water again. in other words, the water coming out of a wastewater treatment plant often enters the watershed, flows into intakes of drinking water treatment plants, and eventually finds its way right back to our faucets. it takes huge investments to ensure that wastewater and drinking water treatment plants function properly to maintain a safe water supply. we made the initial investments in the plants and the pipes. but once we accomplished that, there was this great recognition that we had a series of issues associated with wet weather conditions. storm events where
sacramento, los angeles, from all the communities in between, thank you for coming to our fantastic city to celebrate our asian-pacific heritage month. it is my pleasure to also provide you with a warm welcome and thank you for somebody who worked on this idea to bring everybody here to san francisco, my very good friend. thank you. where are you? when we first talked about this, we said there had to be the place where everybody felt comfortable. there had to be a place where we could feel the excitement of all very different asian american groups. we had to have a place where something wonderful had been accomplished. a leadership change, one that we never thought in our lifetimes. by the way, as you know, i never thought in our lifetimes we would see an african-american president of the united states. what a wonderful location, that is something to celebrate. he has been here many times, president obama. the very surprised we had of being able to celebrate the first asian mayor of san francisco. it was not my doing, it was all of the people of san francisco saying it is about time we c
of california 9.3, from los angeles, san diego, san francisco, all participating in this earthquake drill. that is pretty big large numbers of people that are joining all of you. don't you feel special? yeah, everybody is doing this. i have to my left and right are really important department heads. our chief of police is to my left. he is participating and has a lot of staff to support this effort. we have our fire chief. did you know? you reading from the book, grace for president, she is our female chief of our fire department. to her right is rob, the head department of our department of emergency management. one of the most important departments that's working with police and fire and connected up with the whole state with our school system, school board, principals and students to organize and make sure we are prepared for the next earthquake or emergency. this is why we have the great california shakeup drill. this is why we are doing it all over the state. we have to be a little better prepared. how many of you think that you're prepared for the next earthquake at home? yeah? do y
in los angeles and i got a ticket 20 years ago and never did it again and i think we need to make the pedestrians aware of the rules and they must respect traffic as well and there needs to be outreach there. >> mr. lagos. >> yes, this is a very interesting question and it affects everybody, and i come from a city originally where the cars are king, los angeles, and one of the reasons i came here because the car isn't king here, but for pedestrians it is a problem, and i support reducing automobile traffic in certain parts of san francisco because i think there are parts of san francisco dangerous for pedestrians and bicyclists and i would support any proposal to reduce traffic and those zones in san francisco that have been shown to be dangerous for pedestrians. >> all right. thank you sir. mr. rogers. >> i hope this doesn't seem like a continual drum beat but if they make the park merced project go forward there is going to be a lot more traffic on 19th avenue. with that said i know the cameras are slowing people from going across the yellow lights into the red lights and i th
's gone off in our nation's capital or los angeles, a nuclear device. there has been an earthquake. there has been a hurricane where we thought the good news was the winds blew and it did some damage but all is well, oh, my god, the levies just broke. oh, by the way, there's an earthquake or a tsunami or a nuclear critical accident that's occurred somewhere overseas. how will we respond to that? and then let's bring it closer to home, how did we marry up the capabilities that exist because there is no greater tragedy than to have robust capabilities, mellow medical, logistical or otherwise. you are better prepared with every one of these meetings, you are better prepared with every networking that happens in the hallways and exchanging business cards but you will never be absolutely prepared. what we're doing here today and in future events is a journey, it is not a destination. we will never be able it high five ourselves and say we have everything figured out and we'll be able to solve it the minute it happens. ask anyone who has been in the throes of a complex medical emerg
do when your pager goes off? what will you do if you hear all of a sudden los angeles has been hit by a 6.7. what will los angeles do if they hear san francisco has been hit by a 7.2? what will we do, where will you be, all those people who work for you, do they know their azuped place, do they know where to go? do we in the military understand your roles and responsibilities? do we understand how to integrate into your chain of command? do we understand how to communicate with you? do we understand what we have and how we can bring it to bear with you? do we not want the after action report after the next nightmare scenario it read, we failed to utilize some of the capabilities we had inside and outside our life line. the american people are expecting us to get it right. they are not expecting perfection, they are not expecting huge gaps. they are not expecting some of the missed cues and gaffes that occurs in the gulf port area during katrina. they expected us to learn from that and indeed we have. i caution you again, we are not prepared, we are not prepared for the nex
of a french company in the united states, the great artist had its head in [inaudible] that was in los angeles a couple of days ago, will be in berkeley tomorrow and then after that in new york of course, so there you are, that is how we are civilized together, how we are human beings that try to push ahead san francisco, paris, two cities that are destined to understand everything and do the maximum understanding because san francisco and paris believe in progress, know that it's difficult that progress of a factor of human development, we don't want to forget anybody, we want to shoulder each other, help each other so that the two cities, san francisco and paris be the most attractive cities in the world but also the most smiling cities in the world, the most -- the cities that are worth your affection and that express to the rest of the world their taste of friendship, fraternity, friendship and for that we have to be together, we have to wan -- want to draoe yait toing and we want to make sure that this memorandum of understanding, this understanding between paris and san francisco be a
cities can take elements of sfpark and implement it in the cities. los angeles is working on it. berkeley is working on a project. washington, d.c. is, too. cities are looking at parking management differently than the have in the past. >> later this year, we are gathering all the data we need to evaluate rigorously all our expectations of how this can reduce greenhouse gas emissions, congestion, improve transit speed, reliability, reduc. [applause] >> good evening. i'm the director of transportation. for me, this is not the academy awards. this is the all-star game. the folks sitting over here are truly the all stars of the city. i've had an opportunity to work with ed, harlan, and jocelyn. behalf of all of us. we are also very lucky to have a bunch of people from sfmta, many of them are here. my job is to introduce the awardees. please join me and give a hand for jay primus, george reynolds, steven lee, and lorraine fuqua. >> thank you. this is a tremendous honor. it really does feel fabulous to be recognized. one of the relief fund things about this project is that it is just complex e
-president -- the vice- president visited the united states and i traveled to los angeles with our mayor at the time and what an event. and now a few months later, san francisco is probably hosting the seminar with the ministry of commerce. it shows that our golden mountain continues to attract chinese. has never stopped since the 1800's and because san francisco continues to be the city of innovation and full of peril spirit, we will continue to seek an inflow of inbound chinese businessmen and investors. may i invite our mayor, edwin lee, to the podium? [applause] >> thank you. good morning. i want to of course repeat our warm welcome, ladies and gentleman, to the vice minister and his delegation here. to the council general and his wonderful work and to our lieutenant governor, gavin newsom is here. our senior adviser, mr. rossi and those of you from fremont and san jose and around the bay area, thank you for being here on this first china-united states state and regional economic and trade discussion. as you know, san francisco has been home to the biggest and the oldest chinatown in the united
. these are various projects. los angeles storm drain system. they raised the dam. your water is a product of pw a. they built the sacramento water reservoir. the fans were so well built that in fact, they are still in use. the engineers said we have to replace a ball bearing. we of course, have neglected our infrainstruct our and it's rated to be a d and dropping. so if you don't pay your taxes, things do fall down. much of it is things that were built during the new deal. fortunately, they built them very well. so the stuff was really built to last. but, if you don't have taxes to run a state. i expect we will see more of that stuff. i will give you a brief tour that we take for granted. the commitment to public education in all its manifestations. public schools from kindergarten to higher education. there are thousand of new deal schools built within less than ten years. many have art work in or on them. this is berkeley high school. you shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free. the schools are always telling you that public education can make you better. it should be free. now,
of washington d.c. this is right outside of the co-op. and then urban roads like this in the los angeles river and this is being built. this is mira loma park. this is lark merced blvd. it's all made of clay. it's going to slump. these are the roads built in the oakland hills. nate, red woods. skyline. and enabled them to go up and develop the hills. the rural roads that go through the coast range. this enabled them to get their stuff to market. this is at road built by the ccc. this is a bridge. this is highway one and you won't know, except you look at the bridge and you will see dates, 1938, 1939. the airstrips are ccc. and the one out at treasure island. long beach, burbank. this is oakland and the whole built line railroad was redone. 19 is a pwa project and our great amphitheatres are from that time. this is santa barbara bowl. this is the forest theater in carmel and these are ccc workers putting huge bolder. here's 6 thousand people getting ready to enjoy oklahoma in that theater. big basin is a ccc project and this one, on the east river, new york. a project built where people from th
, very early buildings, like a building down the block built on redwood los angeles, most houses built in san francisco, unless they're modern,Ñi post '75, did nothino mitigate for the soil conditions. if you're the owner of the house, there are other things you can and should consider with the advice of a çó geo technical engineer. >> these are all brick buildings in here. they all pretty much survived the 1906 earthquake and fire. >> in fact, there's a plaque here saying they had to bring a hose a mile over telegraph hill to put out a fire. >> because all the liquor was d here. that's important. >> actually, this bidding behind us, if we can turn around, survived the earthquake and fire. the shutters are still there and part of the historic fabric on the second floor. i've worked on this building for 20 years. one of things they did after the fire -- after the earthquake just before the fire is they lined their roof with brick debris as a fire stop. >> that closed the metal shutters. >> closed the metal shutters and the building survived the fire and that brick rubble is on the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 171 (some duplicates have been removed)